Skip to main content

About your Search

English 48
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
be satisfied as long as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. no, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. i am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution, and staggered by the winds of police brutality. you have been the veterans of creative suffering. continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redementive. go back to mississippi. go back to alabama. go back to south carolina. go back to georgia, go back to louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities. knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friend friends -- [ cheers and applause ] >> -- though even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow i still hav
in mississippi to senator john stennis. in the presidential party were bob haldeman and john ehrlichman. >> we were on air force one. we were going off to dedicate a john stennis memorial rocket launcher or something in mississippi. and i'm standing on the flight deck, and it occurred to me for about 30 seconds that i could crash this airplane and that would put an end to everybody's problems. mine, nixon's and haldeman's, everybody who was aboard. i stepped off that airplane, and usually the drill is richard nixon steps off the airplane and all the cameras click away and all that. he got off and nobody paid any attention to him. i got off and boy, they were all taking morgue shots. >> in the very last conversation i had with him there, we were talking about this break-in, in california. the elsberg psychiatrist break-in. and he said, i didn't know about that, did i? and i had to indicate to him that he did know about it. >> that, of course, is a totally out of our -- have you ever heard of this? >> yes, sir. >> i never heard of it, john. i should have been told about that, shouldn't i? >> i'm
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
i was even lower than a working bee. mississippi for the first part of the summer knowing that there was lots of talk about the march on washington, not knowing if it would ever come to be but mississippi was the last of the states where there had been no demonstrations. but not mississippi. halfway through the summer, i got a call saying "it's going to happen, eleanor. and buy yard is going to do it." he said, "come on up if you want to work on the staff." byyard us are on the. states who could have organized that march. >> ifill: what do you mean? >> there were a set of skills that we had no reason to have so nurtured. there had never been a mass march on washington that anyone. there had been all kind ofmarchs march. what would it take to organize such a march with no experience, no precedent to draw from. >> ifill: no social media, no flash mobs. with only telephones and the usual old-fashioned 20th century means of communication. on.l, first it took it took someone -- and i think buyard put it all in one. he had been a pass f.i.s.edworln civil disobedience in leavenwo
her career as a lawyer for the n.a.a.c.p. in mississippi. also here, taylor branch, the historian who has, of course, written four books on dr. king and the civil rights era. his later "the king years" recently out in paperback. and our friend, ben jealous, the professional of the n.a.a.c.p. i want to start with you, marian. when you were there, did you realize at the time the effect that dr. king's speech was going to have? >> yes. and i realized as one of my own-- the hundreds of thousands property we were a transforming element of nonviolent witness that was unprecedented in our history, as you indicated, people expecting violence. here you had a huge, multiracial, multifaith, multigenerational-- i was 24 at the time-- witness -- >> what did you feel like? were you excited? >> i was exhilarated. i felt empowered. i felt connected. it's always good to know that you're not alone and there are all these people coming out saying, "we're committed to making america, america." it strengthened me as i was being trained to go down to mississippi and practice law. a great day. >> schieffer:
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
shelton was up for it. this was a guy who was born in mississippi. he grew up on a farm in a cotton. he had a lot of different jobs through his life. he was tough as nails and he joined the military when he was 18 years old. he joined as a private and went to korea and saw action right away. he was wounded three times, won the silver star. he came back and decided i love the military. i'm going to make this my career. the only time he left the military was back just before you got married. he decided he was going to try farming again. the military had a policy that you can leave the military for 90 days and returned -- if you return within 90 days you would get your previous rank but after 90 days you have to go back to being a private and at the time he was a sergeant. on the 87th day he returned because farming in mississippi was just too hard and love to the army life and he missed it. so, he decided since he was going to make it a career he was going to do more than learn as much as he possibly could. so at 28 years old to cut off age for becoming an officer, he applied for officer
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
against civil rights. the state of mississippi, which had given fdr something like 95% of the vote gave goldwater 84% in 1964, the guy who participated in the filibuster. >> then the voting rights act of '65 was so important because that changed the face of government in the united states. just like you may have handed the south over to the gop for all those decades, but you really changed -- you changed the united states of america, you know, i think as a result of the better. >> he might have changed party labels but we need to understand that, you know, racism is racism, no matter if it's a democrat or republican. so, the notion that he signed the party away for 30 years, you know, brings me back to the moment of, what's your responsibility of the civil rights leader? that that was a political calculation that lindyn lyndon made. so, yes, this may cost the democratic party, but eventually we believe it's going to benefit the nation. that's where we are today. >> it is interesting -- what it really did, we say it signed the south away for democrats. in a lot of ways it did. but it sor
. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof that chemical weapons were used in syria. as important as what he laid out is what when he did not lay out, is a time line of dealing with syria, going after the regimes. what the did lay out there have to be consequences for any action, any chemical weapon used and said the president at some point in time will decide what to do but made it very, very clear the secretary of state believes there will be some type of action used against sirra, but keep in mind, we have u.n. inspectors on the ground, and seemed to indicate that did not matter. the inspectors would fine there was the use of chemical weapons but could not determine
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. are from th
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? >> mr. speaker, unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i'm not a fan of government mandates, and neither are my constituents in mississippi. but there is one mandate that the people of mississippi sent me to washington with, to repeal, replace, dismantle, delay, and defund obamacare. i have heard from families, small businesses, and hardworking americans across my district who all have the same message -- this law is a train wreck. mr. palazzo: that is why one of my very first votes in congress was to repeal obamacare. that's why i voted to repeal it nearly 40 times over the last three years. that is why i introduce add constitutional amendment to restore the right of the american people to refuse this bad law. that is also why i firmly believe we must defund obamacare in a continuing resolution this body will take up later this year. i believe this is a fight worth fighting for mississippi. and
out dirt farmers all over the midwest and the mississippi valley handing them one-way tickets to the vehicle city as flint nicknamed itself. the newcomers slept in shacks, tents and railroad cars. earl's family rented a tiny house, all he could afford on his factory pay. after the war earl tried farming again, failed again and returned to flint for good. everett grew up a city boy with no agricultural ambitions. after graduating from high school in 1933, he enlisted in general motors as an apprentice tool and dye maker at 50 cents an hour. the job could disappear in a day. if a supervisor wanted to hire his brother-in-law, he created ap opening by handing a worker a yellow slip, the color of termination. bachelors were laid off while married men with lower seniority kept their jobs. the supervision, they had no control either, everett recalled. you could come in today and have a desk and have a yellow slip on there that said you're all done. on november 12th, three welders conducted a short pro-union sit-down demonstration. in protest, a department in the plant stopped working
of emmett till and he is talking about the deaths of two other organizers in mississippi who would try to register to vote and have been killed and she is angry and she is sad and she is despairing because she came to that night having spent more than a decade organizing around cases like this and what was particularly sort of exciting about this case was there have been enough organizing and enough awareness that there had been a trial and yet still the two killers go free. and i wanted to start there because i think many people would have made the comparison between the lynching of emmett till and trayvon martin, but i think we can go deeper in that comparison and to think about that comparison not just as a comparison of sadness and of anger but of what follows. because i know all of you know what's going to happen four days later on december 1, 1955 and that is rosa parks who has spent two decades organizing. she begins her adult political life around around the scottsboro case in spent the past decade turning it into a more activist branch and so she comes to december 1, 1955 with
on a de deadly plane crash that happened in alabama. the ups cargo jet went down in mississippi. look at these pictures. huge ball of fire at that scene this morning. it was about a half a mile short of the runway at birmingham international airport. sadly, the pilot and co-pilot were both lost, both fatalities in this terrific histororrific accident. we heard witnesses describing the scene. >> i got out from bed and went to look in the window in the back and a minute later saw a big flash in the air. in the sky. i saw, i heard big big big explosion, big one. it was the crash of the aircraft. >> amazingly no homes on the ground were damaged. much more on this story coming up. >>> jesse jackson senior is speaking about his son's two year sentence he just received for misusing election money. let's listen to what he had to say. >> i had to raise many questions to myself about did i confuse success with sickness. jesse's been driven to succeed, to be effective. remember, we got the water tank built out in fort heights, whatout was, arguing for the airport, something like that. i did not
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
over the mississippi river, 16 feet more to go. i could watch this go down the nation's greatest river. it was an awesome view. the people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. he represents pennsylvania's ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. thanks for that great example that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. we look forward to those engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. as i have traveled around the coeeg what other
gentleman from mississippi, mr. thompson, for a statement that he may have. >> thank you very much. thank you very much, mr. chairman. i think our witnesses for their expected testimony. in the four months since this small town of west texas was shaken, shockwaves have been felt across the country here in washington and even at 1600 pennsylvania avenue. a scale of death and destruction has come under focus and americans have been forced to ask themselves some very tough questions could this type of event happened here in my community? you facilities with explosives or lethal chemicals pose a risk to my family and my home or my community. the likely response is maybe. and surely the federal government does. this west facility explosion undermines that sense of conflict. the firefighters who have gone in to do what they have been trained. fight a fire. this was a chemical fire fueled by ammonium nitrate and until these explosions in the department of homeland security did not know that the west plant even existed. we administer the risk-based program that requires facilities with threshold
mississippi for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate your interest in my airports but what i want to do is make sure we keep it in the right language. my only -- sensitive personal. it is i do with time and attend a wedding like that in the private sector. it's sensitive security information. and that kind of information, we all agree, is something that is far more serious than someone not showing up for work. now, as important for me in this conversation is whether or not, mr. halinski, you saw the fact that in the contracting with tsa with private contractors, because you do not have the ability to deal with personnel found guilty of that. have you now change the contracting document to tsa to get you to where you need to be? >> yes, sir. we have changed the contract for all the contracts were spp airports, and there is a clause in there that requires them to report any type of misconduct activities of the workforce. and we also require in this new language that if an employee is identified with misconduct, that appropriate action needs to be taken by that company, sir stev
farther to the east, into that lower mississippi valley, as well. as far as the low today, right here, just exiting the rockies, going into those noerns plains. with that, we're going to be looking at the severe weather threat today. extending down through montana, through kansas. we'll be looking for strong thunderstorms. really, we're looking for hail and damaging winds in these areas. then, of course, we have more rain in the southeast. we're looking at another couple of inches of rain into that area. so yes, the big winner, of course, is the northeast. that is where we're seeing temperatures well below normal. it's going to stay that way. you're adding rain to that. i'll take it today. we have the big winners. >> wow. >> thanks. good morning. >>> coming up on new day, up until now, it's just been a fancy name. cyclospora. the big mystery is what is starting it, what is it? officials are ready to talk approximately we'll tell you everything you need to know about this mysterious bug and what's causing it. >> it has been a mystery, for sure. >>> coming up, a daring jail break caught
news channel 12 down in mississippi following the revelations about operation cross country. .his shows improvements needed they know the child sex trafficking response act of 2013 was streamlined data collections and report on sex --fficking by requiring a republican saying that this legislation is intended to improve the ability of caregivers to ensure that children at risk and get help that they require. if you could talk in general terms about what that would do for him. >> this is an issue for us. we estimate about 60% of may be involved in child prostitution's. they may be solicited. it is an issue we are aware of. to make sure that when a kid goes missing a third or fourth or fifth time from these foster homes there is a tendency to not report them. why bother? we need to know when and where they may be going so we can more actively track them and keep them from being alerted to this. >> he talked about some of the john's who use these and crayon these children. start jailing the john's who use child prostitution and putting their faces on page one. is from miramar beach florida
, your thoughts on the president's remarks yesterday. west mississippi, independent line. caller: i completely agree with the president. mr. snowden is not a patriot. one of the most important thing is facing our country now is this whole issue of fiber security. fibrous security is more important to our nation than the budget deficit problem. it is more important than our dependence on foreign oil. we have to be more aggressive with our cyber security protection. when have to be more aggressive with regard to battling against these groups who want to break into our cyber systems that control everything from our financial markets to our power grids and everything else. houston,ther troy from texas. republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think he is a patriot. the government cannot listen to every phone call and every conversation we have. that information is our private property. we should be able to sell it as we see fit. cyber security is no excuse for setting up being cut or a police state. this is a country and it seems like he is a patriot to me. host: suzanne
for a mississippi california girl, the latest on the man underhunt for the alleged abductor and suspected killer. >>> ex-humaning the truth, researchers will dig up secret graves at a florida reform school. what is behind the new efforts to uncover this school's deadly history? >>> also the american town where a 4-year-old, there is he, the 4-year-old who is now mayor again. you're watching msnbc. my mother made the best toffee in the world. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to today and make your business dream a reality. at we put the law on your side. at, we offer our users... guaranteed upfront savings. the result? truecar users save... over $3,000... on average. save time, save money, and never overpay. visit if you've got it, you know how hard
to the summer of 1955 to the killing of emma ll. a 14-year-old african-american boy, and went to mississippi to be with an spawn uncle and cousin and is lynched. dragged out of the bed in the middle of the night by a white bomb and -- mob and ends up in the body of the river. when emma's body was found, -- emmett was 14, she was 14 when she dee integrated the central high school in, a. but emmett, when his body was sent back to chicago, his mother, maimy till, wasn't an activist, she was forced into this. losing her only child. she said she wanted the casket open for the wake and the funeral. she wanted the world to see the ravages of racism. the brutality of big industry. thousands streamed by his casket and saw, and then jet magazine, another black publication, took photographed of the disextendded, mutilated head, and they were published and seared into the history and consciousness of this country. she had something very important to teach the press. show the pictures. show the images. cue imagine if for just one week we saw the images of war, every newspaper had a picture of a dead baby
from katrina: how my mississippi hometown lost it all what mattered." i want to ask a brief question. how do you get cities to be willing to invest in resilience in the tough times in something that might happen. preparing for the possible when they are dealing with so many presses issues right now, again, the economy, crime,th. >> thank you. i would like jane first to lead off about a project might be working on. >> david mentioned that i'm working on a project, i have been because we have been so blessed in joplin and certainly not become experts by any mean. i think we have a set of practical experience. i've collected so far about 40 essays from people across all sector of joplin who are vod -- involved in recovery from the hospital chief to the city manager to the superintendent of schools about what we learn in the first year we think are lessons can pass on what we wish wed had known. the more i publicly state my goal the more it has to happen. i'm hoping i'll be done with it by the end of september and able to give it out to anyone in a way that is interested in a community o
a bridge spanning mississippi and minneapolis crashed during rush hour, killing 13 people and injuring 145. today i want to ask my colleagues a very simple question, should not americans be able to drive across a highway bridge with a reasonable expectation that it will not crumble away from underneath them? 67,000 bridges in our country are rated structurally deficient. 67,000 bridges. when those bridges fall, it isn't just the unlucky few on those bridges who suffer. whole economies that rely on safe and efficient transportation suffer. the i-5 bridge across the river just doesn't connect burlington and mount vernon, it connects the entire west coast and carries millions of dollars' worth of trade every day between can in a dean and the u.s. here's the good news. we know how to build safe bridges. there are thousands of civil engineers devoting their lives today to building good structures that don't fall down, but we need to pay for thefment we need to maintain them. maintain them when they are old and replace them when they need to. we can't wait for them to crumble into the water belo
many different ways can you make cod? >> ainsley: then mississippi, then alabama. >> tucker: have you been to high land foreign grill outside birmingham? >> brian: is this a push back on the study? >> tucker: this is a push back. >> ainsley: how about drunkest state? what do you think it is? louisiana, florida, california? where is nevada on there. >> tucker: what about maine? come on. >> ainsley: the rudest state. come on! who did they ask? new york? >> tucker: yeah. that's the foulest area. >> ainsley: shocker. new york, new jersey, then california. >> brian: if you get a chance to see people in california, they do seem rude. nicest state, georgia, minnesota or hawaii? all nice people and nice looking states. >> tucker: they're all nice. the cost of insurance is rising with obamacare a lot. what if there was a way around that? meet the doctor who saved one patient $17,000 by not using his insurance. >> ainsley: then the next batman is revealed. the name that no one expected. that's coming up. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy a
a barge down the mississippi, tanker cars, or trucks. >> there's a story that was first report bid the hill newspaper saying that the e he on would likely be uld -- >> that's actedly not a new storyifment that came out a couple years ago and was investigated. and my understanding is there were no conflicts found. what you're starting to see is a recycling of a lot of events. keep in mind that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite cross-border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this is now taking longer again, we could have built the empire state building five times by now, we completed world war ii in less time. so at some point you start to say, we've had four studies. we've had this, we've had that. at some point the question is has this policy really been high jacked or are we still on path? > eric from our democrat's line. >> we have environmental studies. we've also had practical xperience with spills. i don't know where o you're getting your safety record from, the 99.999%. if one of these pipelin
history. just last week had had the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. it was an awesome view. the people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. he represents is obeying his ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. thanks for that great example that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. we look forward to those engagements. it is an opportunit
. where are you from, columbus, where? >> mississippi. >> is that your sister? is she cool. >> okay. look at this next segment. i'm going to show you cool stuff for school. getting ready to go back to school. some kids are back in class. do they have everything they need and want, must haves. amy goodman is here. amy good woman is what i should say. >> i love that. pleasure to be here. >> they want cool stuff but don't break our bank account. >> the latest and greatest. there are a lot of wonderful sales this weekend as well. starting off with the super neat backpacks. this is actually for a younger set, preschoolers or kindergartners. because it has a case inside the backpack which makes the kid a superhero. i call this super fly. my toddler darting out the door in the morning, takes him forever. now he's going to fly. >> that's cool. >> seven different signs. great for boys and girls. >> just under $40. >> where can you get them? >> super me website. >> you like them? i like them. >> people still use lunchboxes. >> everything vintage is new again. this is from our era. annivers
in the south like louisiana, mississippi. you know, what's happening in some of those states in terms of -- is that helping or hurting? >> that's a really important point. this is kind of one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. richard vedder is the expert on this who you'll hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have shunned the south other than texas. in fact, that's been a problem for growth in the south for a hundred, since the end of the civil war. now you're seeing dixie attracting the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states that has had the biggest percentage increase in immigration over last 15 years has been georgia. and georgia actually has become a high growth state. and this gets to the point people ask are immigrants more attracted to a state that has high welfare went fits -- benefits or to a state that has jobs. and so we rooked at some of -- we looked at some of this evidence, and what we found was on balance immigrants are much more likely to go to states with low unemployment rates than they are to go to the s
more eligible. host: jerry houston, mississippi. go ahead, jerry. caller: yes, ma'am, i respect and highly appreciate mr. besharov and his comments. however, education starts at the home, and they've got to focus on poor choices. we all make them. we've all made bad, poor choices. we can't continue this charade of talking around the mountain. you go through the mountain and you only go through with the word alive and the word is focus on the fundamentals. we have to educate children at a young age and raise them properly and then we don't have children having children. we've got to stop this going bananas in schools and this is not teaching a kid at 10 years old to go pick up a morning after pill. we've got to get real. it's not rocket science, it's life or it's death. i do not worship death and i know the good doctor does not either. ost: douglas besharov. guest: the challenge in all these social programs is help those in need without generating greater need. that affects every program we have. even affects foreign aid. so it's a challenge. and what i wish we could do here in w
. this is in mississippi. the incredible architecture led the recovery effort, and what he did was didn't say we're rebuilding your community, but we're coming in to rebuild with your community, and that rebuilding center is now an economic development center. is us in a nutshell; right? this is when people ask what do architects do? this is us. the reality is that it's value. i'm going to go through a bunch of projects quickly to talk value. what value do we bring? the value of safety, anyone in a tough neighborhood understands what safety and security and security brings. here we are. the roughest neighborhood in south africa with the highest instance of violence murder, rapes, and violence crime. ddpu, rather than saying, hey, we want to do a do-good project, but -- put it by the highways. there's a tactical approach of urban planning, seeing where the areas were, and that's where we go, doing urban a.q. puncture -- acupuncture. we ended up in a park that has -- basically a park where women were raped, murdered, and dumped for decades, and it was across the street from the school. that's one
answer. quinn: yes. one. gloments thompson: no. >>this season? thompson: no. in mississippi. >> no time for baseball this year, sadly. weiner: no , sir. john liu, should there be more surveillance camera in our city. >> yes. quinn: yes. thompson: yes. liu: yes. >> no. albanese: yes. >> moderator: have you ever texted while driving? [laughter] quinn: no. thompson: [whistling] yes, i have. i have stopped doing it. glel i have a driver. [laughter] that's a good answer. my wife is sitting in the front row. if i would said no. yes, i have sinned. i have stopped now. weiner: yes. [laughter] [laughter] [laughter] tough act to follow. [laughter] thompson: no. i have but i have never smoked pot. [laughter] >> moderator: do you have a men to card in your pocket? thompson: yes. >> yes. weiner: -- [inaudible] albanese: yes. liu: yeah, i have mine too. pocket or purse? quinn: pocketbook. >> moderator: have you ever taken a bus or subway without paying? albanese: no. >> no. >> no. >> no. >> yes, but i have my school bus pass. [laughter] quinn: no. >> no. >> moderator: if you are elected, will you li
. the author of several historical novels he spoke from the more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson this time more so than in the weather is what took place about 40 miles west of here which is what i want to talk about tonight at vicksburg. i mean, this is quite a story and it is a story that some people around here don't know. that is great fun for me, but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention. whenever i am doing in the event like this, i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason because some time many years ago you wrote a book called the killer angels. every time i say that people not there had. if you have no idea what that is , that's okay. is not required. we will explain it to you. threatened by my father, cannot in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now, with the killer angels' is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. this is not a history book will. it's a story as told to you from the characters themselves. the people is decisions
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)